Acupuncture

Acupuncture & Acupressure

Stimulation of muscles and nerves to balance blood flow and promote long-term health and wellbeing.

Treatment for aches, pains, and neurological disorders

Safe, effective pain relief

Long-term health and balance

 

What is acupuncture?

Acupuncture

Acupuncture is a type of treatment that involves inserting ultra-thin needles at specific points on the body and at varying depths.

 

While the technique is derived from Traditional Chinese Medicine, the treatment has risen in popularity across the world, with over 10 million treatments given annually in the US alone [1].

Treatment areas

Acupuncture treatment can help address a range of conditions, particularly those in which pain is typically chronic.

The World Health Organization's review and analysis of reports on clinical trials [2] indicates that acupuncture is an effective treatment for 28 diseases and disorders, including:

  • Adverse reactions to radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy

  • Allergic rhinitis (including hay fever)

  • Depression

  • Dental and facial pain

  • Elbow pain

  • Headache

  • Hypertension

  • Knee pain

  • Nausea & Vomiting (inc. morning sickness)

  • Neck pain

  • Shoulder pain (inc. periarthritis)

  • Rheumatoid arthritis

  • Sciatica (nerve pain)

  • Sprains

  • Stroke.

What is acupressure?

Acupressure

Acupressure is a form of treatment that involves applying manual pressure to specific spots on the body, usually with the fingertips or elbow.

Similar to acupuncture, it stems from Traditional Chinese Medicine and utilizes the same theories and concepts. As such, it's often thought of as 'acupuncture without needles'.

Treatment areas​

Acupressure is a painless treatment that can, like acupuncture, treat a wide range of areas.

A variety if research studies have suggested acupressure may provide effective treatment for conditions including (but not limited to):

  • Cancer-related fatigue [3,4]

  • Insomnia [5,6]

  • Irritable bowel syndrome (symptom relief) [7]

  • Lower back pain [8]

  • Menstrual pain [8]

  • Nausea and vomiting (post-operative) [8,9]

  • Painful shoulder syndrome [10]

  • Pregnancy pain [8].

 

How does treatment work?

Traditional explanation

Traditional Chinese Medicine explains our health through the balance of the opposing 'yin' and 'yang' life forces - or 'qi' - that flow throughout the body. While strong health is associated with balance of the qi, illness is explained as deriving from energy imbalances.

This energy is said to flow across the body through 12 'meridians' (or channels), accessible via 361 specific acupoints.

Both acupuncture and acupressure seek to correct energy imbalances by stimulating specific combinations of the acupoints.

Video courtesy of WebMD

Scientific explanation

"An abundance of information has now accumulated concerning the neurobiological mechanisms of acupuncture, in relation to both neural pathways and neurotransmitters/hormonal factors that mediate autonomic regulation, pain relief and other therapeutics." [11]

Some scientists explain acupuncture and acupressure through neurobiology, seeing the acupoints as specific positions where the muscles and nerves can be stimulated to bring about benefit to the muscular [12], immune [13], cardiovascular [14] and autonomic nerve systems [15], as well as blood flow [16].

Video courtesy of FXNL Media

References & Citations


1. Hao JJ, Mittelman M. Acupuncture: past, present, and future. Glob Adv Health Med. 2014;3(4):6-8. doi:10.7453/gahmj.2014.042 2. British Acupuncture Council. WHO List of Conditions. https://www.acupuncture.org.uk/public-content/public-traditional-acupuncture/4026-who-list-of-conditions.html Accessed: 29 Jan 2021 3. Ling W.M., Lui L.Y., So W.K. Effects of acupuncture and acupressure on cancer-related fatigue: a systematic review. Oncol Nurs Forum. 2014;41:581–592 4. Zick SM, et al. Relaxation acupressure reduces persistent cancer-related fatigue. Evid Based Complement Altern Med 2011;2011.pii:142913 5. Yeung W.F., Chung K.F., Poon M.M. Acupressure, reflexology, and auricular acupressure for insomnia: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials. Sleep Med. 2012;13:971–984 6. Sarris J, Byrne GJ. A systematic review of insomnia and complementary medicine. Sleep Med Rev 2011;15:99-106 7. Xing L.Y., Qu L.X., Chen H. Clinical observation on acupressure at Jiaji points for irritable bowel syndrome. Zhongguo Zhen Jiu. 2013;33:739–742 8. Robinson N, et al. The evidence for Shiatsu; a systematic review of Shiatsu and acupressure. BMC Complement Altern Med 2011;11:88. 9. Lee A, et al. Stimulation of the wrist acupuncture point P6 for preventing postoperative nausea and vomiting 10. Zanelatto, Ana Paula. (2013). [Evaluation of ear acupressure on painful shoulder syndrome: case study]. Revista brasileira de enfermagem. 66. 694-701. 10.1590/S0034-71672013000500009 11. Ma SX. Neurobiology of Acupuncture: Toward CAM. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2004;1(1):41-47. doi:10.1093/ecam/neh017 12. Itoh K, Minakawa Y, Kitakoji H. Effect of acupuncture depth on muscle pain. Chin Med. 2011;6(1):24. Published 2011 Jun 22. doi:10.1186/1749-8546-6-24 13. Liang F, Cooper EL, Wang H, Jing X, Quispe-Cabanillas JG, Kondo T. Acupuncture and Immunity. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2015;2015:260620. doi:10.1155/2015/260620 14. Ballegaard S, Muteki T, Harada H, Ueda N, Tsuda H, Tayama F, Ohishi K. Modulatory effect of acupuncture on the cardiovascular system: a cross-over study. Acupunct Electrother Res. 1993 Apr-Jun;18(2):103-15. doi: 10.3727/036012993816357548. PMID: 7902640. 15. Li, Q. Q., Shi, G. X., Xu, Q., Wang, J., Liu, C. Z., & Wang, L. P. (2013). Acupuncture effect and central autonomic regulation. Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine : eCAM, 2013, 267959. doi:10.1155/2013/267959 16. Takayama S, Watanabe M, Kusuyama H, et al. Evaluation of the effects of acupuncture on blood flow in humans with ultrasound color Doppler imaging. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2012;2012:513638. doi:10.1155/2012/513638





 

Acupuncture & Acupressure at Rin Spine Center Hong Kong

Your First Visit

During your first visit to Rin Spine Center's Hong Kong clinic, you'll be met by friendly reception staff who are on hand to get you set up for your session in a matter of minutes.

Here's a guide to what you can expect from your first visit:

1.

Initial Consultation

You'll speak directly with our Registered Chinese Medicine Oractitioner, Dr. Eric Hwangbo, about your physical and mental condition, as well as your medical history. 

2.

Physical Examination

The doctor will conduct a hands-on examination, applying pressure to various parts of the body, in order to identify the nature of your condition/s. Be prepared to receive physical contact in a range of areas, as the source of symptoms is often away from the area of discomfort.

3.

Acupuncture and/or acupressure treatment

Depending on the nature of your condition/s, the practitioner may recommend either acupuncture, acupressure or a mixture of the two.

 

In the case of acupuncture, this involves inserting tiny needles into the skin at specific points. For acupressure, this involves applying manual pressure using the fingertips or elbow.

Rest assured that you won't undergo any procedure you feel uncomfortable with - so don't worry if, for example, you're not keen on needles.

4.

Chinese herbal medicine

In some cases, the doctor may recommend taking a specific combination of Chinese herbal medicine to help your condition post-treatment.

He is able to write prescriptions for medicine that you can collect from a nearby Chinese herbalist.

Payment & Insurance

Treatment Fees

Payment Methods

We accept cash, credit card (Visa & MasterCard) and debit card (UnionPay).

Claiming Back Fees on Insurance

Kindly note:

Every insurance provider and policy is different.

If you'd like to claim back fees, it is your responsibility to ensure you read, understand and follow the terms of coverage and claims submission process of your insurance policy.

 

Rin Spine Center takes no responsibility for handling, submitting or advising on insurance claims. However, we're very happy to provide treatment receipts for all treatment you attend. 

Many private health insurance plans in Hong Kong cover treatment for Chinese Medicine, Acupuncture or Acupressure, and many of our patients claim back their fees from their insurers.

If you would like to claim back fees for treatment, you should check your insurance policy carefully for what kinds of treatment it covers and the terms for making a claim.

 

Location

Rin Spine Center offers acupuncture and acupressure services from a convenient location just few minutes' walk from Hong Kong Central MTR.

 

CONTACT

+852 2886 8482

+852 9334 0944

Write to us

Book a session

RIN SPINE CENTER
RIN AESTHETICS CLINIC

Suite 1007, 10/F
Yu To Sang Building

37 Queen's Road Central
Central, Hong Kong

OFFICE HOURS

Mon:  10am - 7pm

  Tue:  10am - 7pm

     Wed:       Closed        

  Thu:  10am - 7pm

    Fri:  10am - 7pm

   Sat:  10am - 2pm

    Sun:       Closed      

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